Managing Complexity In Musculoskeletal Conditions: Reflections From A Physiotherapist

I was fortunate enough to have been invited by Physio First to contribute to their journal ‘In Touch’ and I chose to write about managing complexity with the different types of ‘evidence’ that we deal with in a healthcare setting.

This is an area of interest for me and I still grapple with many areas of clinical practice.  These include balancing the normative and narrative examination, evaluating and weighting the evidence appropriately for the person seeking care in front of me and also reconciling and communicating the reasoning process within a person centred framework.  Clearly, this is work in progress and I hope this reflective piece demonstrates a movement in this direction.

I hope this paper is informative and useful in that it shares some of my deliberations, thoughts and perspectives in clinical care.

Many thanks to Physio First http://www.physiofirst.org.uk/ for giving me the opportunity to share this.

Managing complexity in MSK conditions In Touch Article

Fusion of perspectives

Please feel free to make comments and feedback your thoughts and views below.

 

 

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5 comments

  1. Reblogged this on Rani blogs about causation etc. and commented:
    In this blog (and linked article), physiotherapist Matt Low explains how he uses patient narratives, mind-maps and the vector model of causation to help his patients. The result is a person-centered approach that emphasises causal complexity, individual context and the idea that at least some of the causes of pain can be counteracted and thus controlled by the patient. Matt is a collaborator of CauseHealth and this is his second article describing his unique approach to chronic pain.

  2. Reblogged this on CauseHealth and commented:
    In this blog (and linked article), physiotherapist Matt Low explains how he uses patient narratives, mind-maps and the vector model of causation to help his patients. The result is a person-centered approach that emphasises causal complexity, individual context and the idea that at least some of the causes of pain can be counteracted and thus controlled by the patient. Matt is a collaborator of CauseHealth and this is his second article describing his unique approach to chronic pain.

  3. Our range of social behavior-life performance and biological vitality is limited by our human physiology,

    A complex system approach should consider that our biology(and biomechanics) is saturated with emotional load and suppressed biological vitality, limiting our organismic functionality(and adaptive physiology).

    To me we should consider improving the imperfect/lacking contact with basic and spontaneous biologically determined movements that characterize the organism These contacts may be more or less disturbed, but it is always disturbed. To me these processes are the organisms own keys to human transformation-performance.

    One way is to start releasing/transforming experiences saturated as disturbances in human physiological adaptation systems, (vegetative system) Then the organism starts, partly through epigenetic mechanisms a deep structural transformation and a rebuilding of brain and body.

    One method called Vegetative training is an incredibly powerful way of putting the homeostasis/allostasis (performance characteristic) of an organism in movement, to support an in-depth transformation of its dynamic. One session about 45 min. Every session will gradually improve all functions of the organism. (Improving our level of biological vitality).

    Improvement starts centrally in the organism and partly through epigenetic mechanisms spread peripherally to all other biochemical, physiological, somatic, emotional and cognitive processes.

    Im sending You good vibes from sunny Bayern.

    Mr. Inge Jarl Clausen

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